Functional Canine Conditioning Part 3: Speed

The 4 Elements Of A Functional Canine Conditioning Program:
Power. Athleticism. Speed. Endurance. (P.A.S.E.)

Part 3: Speed!!

When you see a dog run and think to yourself, “Wow that dog is fast!”, what are you looking at? Is it how fast the dog runs in the open field? What about how fast the dog runs an agility course? Is it how fast the dog starts? Stops? Or changes direction? At The Martial ARFS™ we define speed using 4 components:  Reaction, Direction, Acceleration,  & Sprint, and you must train them all to improve your dog’s performance.

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Functional Canine Conditioning: Part 1: Power

The 4 Elements Of A Functional Canine Conditioning Program:
Power. Athleticism. Speed. Endurance. (P.A.S.E.)

Part 1: Power

Each of the 4 elements are comprised of several key components that make up that element. Ignoring any component of any element ruins the integrity of the entire process and you will most likely never see the result you’re hoping to achieve. There are 4 components to developing a “functionally” more powerful canine athlete. They are: Strength, Stability, Flexibility, Connection.

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The Martial ARFS™ on Dogster.com

Recently, Whitney C. Harris from dogster.com stopped by with her dog Finley to take class and do an article on us, Below is some of what she had to say. You can read the full article here.

So, like any modern-day pet parent, I took to the Internet to find a solution for my puppy problem. When I discovered The Martial Arfs dog training and fitness center, I nearly tripped running to the phone. The program requires no prior training and offers classes for dogs of all ages, abilities, and temperaments.

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More Than Canine “Core” Conditioning.

 By Jeris Pugh

In my intro post, I wrote that the foundation to conditioning was based on functional strength and how to build it. But we can’t use that concept as a foundation to conditioning our dogs if we don’t know what conditioning means. Sure we can copy what someone else does, but we have no Cooper 6 copyidea if that is what we should be doing for our dog.

When I trained people, I was taught “The Core”, in short, were the muscles that stabilize, flex, extend, and rotate the spine. A weak core will usually be the result of a sedentary lifestyle and most likely result in lower back issues now or in the future, along with poor and inefficient athletic movement. Continue reading More Than Canine “Core” Conditioning.

Martial ARFS™ Canine Conditioning Principles Introduction

By Jeris Pugh (Owner, Martial ARFS™)

Over the next few weeks and possibly months, The Martial ARFS™ Blog will be posting a series of entries. These entries will be based upon the conditioning principles that we use to improve performance and prevent injury in canine athletes and active companions.border_collie_balance_fitpaws_donut

Though many people talk about canine core conditioning and body awareness we have taken the tedious process of specifying what that means and how you can apply it to a specific conditioning program for your dog.

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“Fightin’ Fido’s Fat”

Martial “ARFS” Dog Gym Helps Owners “Fight Fido’s Fat” For The New Year

Long Island NY. January 5, 2015 –The Martial “ARFS”, Long Island’s only “Dog Gym”, is helping dogs (and owners) lose weight, improve health, and burn off excess energy this New Year (and all year long!).

Gyms, Martial Arts Classes, Zumba Studios, and others provide a place for people to “fight the fat”. What about our pets? According to the latest (2013) Pet Obesity Prevention Survey more than 54% of our furry family members are overweight. The Martial ARFS™FatDog veterinary adviser Dr. Eve Pugh states, “As a veterinarian, I see a multitude of pet ailments related to obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Conditions like heart disease, osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, and cancer can all be attributed to having an overweight pet.  Even worse, on average, an overweight pet can have a decreased life expectancy up to 2.5 years.  Dr. Eve Pugh continues, “Simply taking longer walks is often ineffective and sometimes weather prohibitive, especially in the cold winter months.”

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